What’s the Real Cost of a Bad Hire?

Source: What’s the Real Cost of a Bad Hire?

No matter what stat you use, the cost of a bad hire is significant. To compensate for this risk, many employers make an equally costly mistake: they take too long to interview. A slow interviewing process can kill your chances of consistently hiring top talent. It’s one of the most overlooked and costly mistakes employers make with recruiting. Instead of overcompensating because of the risk of making a mistake, look at eliminating unnecessary steps and focus on how to interview more effectively.

Key Strategies for Acing the Interview

(From an article by Lou Adler, CEO of The Adler Group, a talent acquisition consulting firm. Full text of the article can be found here: http://www.linkedin.com/today/post/article/20130911212503-15454-10-things-job-seekers-must-do-to-get-a-better-job)

  1. Focus on the job, not the money. It’s better to be underpaid than overpaid. Getting promoted or obtaining a big compensation increase will only occur after you’ve demonstrated great performance. Ignore anyone who says otherwise. (For salespeople, remember that the higher your base compensation, the more scrutiny you’ll face from your employer. Isn’t it better to start out by flying under the radar?)
  2. Present your strengths and weaknesses via short stories. Without a doubt, you will be a more compelling candidate if you directly connect your past successes to each of the key competencies for the position. Be prepared to provide detailed information, including dates, measurable results, actual deliverables, and any supporting information needed to validate them. Use the SMARTe acronym to form the answers: Specific task, Metrics, Action taken, Results and deliverable defined, the Time frame, and a description of the e Don’t be shy about addressing the mistakes you’ve made, what you learned from them, and how it made you better at your job.
  3. Skip the generalities. Don’t say you’re motivated, strong, dedicated, a great problem-solver or a great team player, or whatever, unless you can back it up with proof. Let the interviewer determine if you’re strong, dedicated or a team player, based on the examples you present.
  4. Divide and conquer by asking the universal question. Very early in the interview, or phone screen, you must ask the interviewer to describe the focus of the job, some of the big challenges, and how the new person’s performance will be measured. Pick at least two from this list. Then prove each is a core strength using the SAFW response below.
  5. Practice the universal answer to any question. You need to be able to validate all of your strengths with specific examples. Form your answer using the SAFW two-minute response: Say A Few Words – Statement – Amplify – few Examples – Wrap-up.
  6. Weave the 10 Best Predictors of Job Success into Your SAFW Response. I just wrote a post for interviewers on how to evaluate your answers. Make sure you have an example proving you possess at least three or four of these strengths. Then during the interview ask if these traits are important for on-the-job success. Of course they will be. Then give your example. Note: this is a slam dunk!
  7. Use the phone screen to minimize the impact of a weak first impression. Even if you make a good first impression, it’s important to ask the universal question (see above) early in the phone screen. Answering it correctly will increase the likelihood you’ll be invited to an onsite interview. This will help focus the actual interview on your past performance, instead of box-checking your skills and experience, or judging you on first impressions.
  8. Uncover any concerns before the end of the interview. To determine where you stand, ask the interviewer about next steps. If they’re not specific, you probably won’t be called back. In this case, ask the interviewer to share the biggest concern he/she has about your background. Then ask how the skill, trait or factor mentioned is used on the job. To overcome the concern, you’ll need to use the SAFW two-minute response to prove you can handle the requirement.

Lou Adler’s latest book, The Essential Guide for Hiring & Getting Hired (Workbench, 2013), covers the Performance-based Hiring process described in this article in more depth. For instant hiring advice join Lou’s LinkedIn group and follow his Wisdom About Work series on Facebook.

The Truth About Interviews

The best interviews are always a two-way street. A fluid, dynamic conversation will impress any employer – it will tell them that you are confident, knowledgeable and, most of all, that you will be someone they’d like to work with. This quick read contains some excellent tips that’ll help you shine. The Truth About Interviews | LinkedIn

Tips for Acing a Video Interview

This content comes mostly from the following article:

8 tips for your next video job interview
Katherine Noel
(http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-do-a-video-job-interview-2016-3)
Mar. 21, 2016

Job interviews can be nerve-racking, especially if you’re meeting the hiring manager for the first time via webcam in your living room.

Since video interviews are typically faster, easier, and more cost-effective than an in-person meeting or long phone call, many companies are now using them to expedite the hiring process.

“Companies are implementing video interviews more and more, and people are actually getting hired faster now, because it’s less time and less aggravation on both ends,” says Paul J. Bailo, a digital executive and author of “The Essential Digital Interview Handbook.” “The key problem with video interviews, though, is that job seekers don’t know how to do them.”

Here are eight tips to improve your video-interviewing skills and land the job:

  1. Double-check your audio, video, and internet connection

Always test your video and audio right before an interview to ensure everything is working properly. Just because it worked a month ago doesn’t mean it’s going to work today, and you don’t want to risk the headache or embarrassment of technology issues during a conversation with a potential employer.

A stable wireless connection is also essential, so be sure to choose a location where you know spotty connection won’t disrupt your video.

  1. Pick a distraction-free background

You want the focus to be on your face and what you’re saying during the interview, so choosing a clear background that’s business-like and free of distractions is key.

Avoid windows and walls full of pictures, posters, or knickknacks. Clear all books and clutter off your desk — basically, you want to eliminate anything that could draw the interviewer’s attention away from you. If you can’t find a good backdrop at your office or at home, then just use a solid wall.

Choose a location that’s free from the distractions of children, roommates or pets. (And don’t even think of doing a video interview from a coffee shop.) Hang a sign on the door asking mail carriers and package deliverers not to ring the doorbell. Make sure the background is free from clutter and embarrassing items like laundry piles. Set up lighting that’s bright but not glaring, illuminating your face from the front. Natural light is best.

  1. Make sure you’re in a well-lit room and the interviewer can see you clearly

Pay attention to the lighting. You want the interviewer to be able to see your face clearly, so try a test video beforehand to make sure lights aren’t casting any shadows on your face. Bailo says people often have just one overhead light shining down on them from the ceiling, but this creates shadows and can be unflattering.

Aim to have one light coming from behind you, one light on your right, and one light on your left to create a glow around you.

  1. Angle and eye contact are critical

Where do you look during a video interview? It’s one of the most common questions people have, and it’s easy to get thrown off if you’re not used to video chatting. Although it may not feel natural at first, you want to speak to the camera, not the screen.

Maintain eye contact by looking directly into the camera instead of at the screen or at your own photo. Also, be sure to speak clearly so the microphone picks up your voice and the interviewer doesn’t have to strain to hear you.

Always position your camera at eye-level, not above or below you. “The angle is so critical,” Bailo says. “You don’t want the camera looking up your nose, and you don’t want the camera looking down at you. The psychology behind it is if I’m looking down at the camera, I’m looking down at the hiring manager, and they feel subservient.”

  1. Frame yourself from the chest up

Showing yourself from the waist or chest up is generally recommended for video interviews, so you don’t look like a floating head. You don’t want to be so close to the camera that the interviewer can count your nose hairs.

Bailo explains that the triangle formed from the top of your head down to your shoulders is the focal point, because all of your communication is going to be coming from your face — your emotion, your expression, your smiling — and that’s what’s going to get you the job.

  1. Dress for the job you want

While it may be tempting to do the interview sans pants with your nicest shirt, resist that urge. You want to dress exactly as if you were going for the interview in person. This can have a strong effect on your mindset, and if you’re too comfortable in the boxers or sweatpants you’re rocking out of frame, that will come through in your attitude and speech.

You always want to look your best for an interview, so wash your face, brush your teeth, comb your hair, and prepare the same as you would for an in-person meeting. Your dress and level of formality should match the industry for which you’re interviewing; if the job is at a firm where workers wear suits every day, you should wear a suit for your video interview.

Keep makeup natural-looking, and avoid wearing too much jewelry, which can be distracting and catch light from the wrong angle. Choose clothing colors that complement your skin tone, and make sure your clothing melds well with the background as well, Bailo advises.

  1. Keep your body language open

Just as with an in-person interview, it’s important to be cognizant of your body language in order to leave a positive impression on the interviewer.

It’s fine to gesture while you speak, but be careful to keep your hand movements contained and within the video frame, and be aware that your gestures aren’t always going to translate over video the same way they would in person.

It’s also crucial to maintain a pleasant facial expression during the interview. “You’re creating an image of yourself as soon as you turn on your camera,” says Barbara Pachter, etiquette and communication expert and author of “The Essentials of Business Etiquette: How to Greet, Eat, and Tweet Your Way to Success.” “You want the person to like you and hire you, so smile! If you look frozen or scared for your life, why would they hire you?”

  1. Think of it as a show

Bailo tells his clients to think of video interviews as one-man studio shows.

“With the audio, the video, the lights, and everything else, you want to realize that we’re building a studio,” he says. “And you’re the star — you have to prepare because you’re the sound person, you’re the light person, you’re the camera person, you’re the copyright person, you’re the makeup artist. You’re everything to put this show on, so you really have to think of yourself as a Hollywood star.”

  1. Hit pause

Digital connections can be delayed. To avoid talking over your interviewer or having your first few words cut out, let the interviewer finish the question and then pause for a few seconds before delivering your answer.

If you take the time to prepare your answers and follow these video interview tips, you’ll be more likely to make a great impression and hopefully score the job — or at least a second interview.

 

 

Ten Things Every Good Recruiter Does Right

This is a very good article, but I take issue with #7. While salary history isn’t required, it helps recruiters to make sure they are putting you together with the right opportunities.

Jeff

A great recruiter is an incredible ally in your career, but the wrong recruiter will dim your flame and leave you frustrated. Hold out for the best of the best!

Source: Ten Things Every Good Recruiter Does Right

Stories Tell it All!

I’m a huge fan of using “mini-stories” during interviews. When prepping candidates, I strongly encourage them to prepare short stories about their on-the-job successes, especially ones tied to the competencies an employer is looking for. There’s just no better way to demonstrate your ability to be effective in the role. Here’s an excerpt from an article that backs this up:

After a presentation, 63% of attendees remember stories. Only 5% remember statistics.

If you were a candidate looking for a job in recruitment and you read the following two statements in two different job ads, which job would you be more likely to apply to?

  • Job ad #1: “You will have responsibility for the identification and hire of 15 new staff.”
  • Job ad #2: “We started last year with 6 people. Stephen and Reza then joined us as interns after responding to a Youtube video; no salary, just the will to grow and learn. Lisa trained as a Black Belt 3 years ago in her old job. She called asking us if we were hiring and we snapped her up. Since then we’ve hired Johnny’s brother Graham and his mate Dave. This year, your job will be to scale this to 15 more people. You’ve got your work cut out! ;)”

Both job ads tell us exactly the same thing, but job ad #2 has given us so much more insight into the company looking to hire. We now know the story of how they’ve gotten to where they are now. We feel invested in the people mentioned in this story. We’d love to meet them. And we’re relishing the challenge of putting our skills to the test to find more people like Stephen, Reza, Lisa, Graham and Dave, and adding to this already great team.

As the incredible Chip and Dan Heath said in their book ‘Made to Stick‘, “Credible ideas make people believe. An emotional idea makes people care. The right stories make people act.” And as recruiters, that’s exactly what we need them to do, act! We need to compel the right people to apply for our jobs. And the best way to do that is through storytelling in your job ads. Storytelling grabs attention in a crowded marketplace and makes you memorable.

10 Insightful Company Culture Questions to Ask Your Interviewer

You’ve landed an interview for a job that aligns with your skill sets and interests. The work sounds like a perfect match for you, and the compensation package matches your needs. But there’s one important factor that could change your mind about wanting to work there: the company culture.

– Read the full article here: http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/8897-company-culture-questions.html